Lead Inhalation Alert: Tap Water in Medical Devices

Attention Patients:

USE DISTILLED WATER IN MEDICAL DEVICES

Due to the state of emergency with the City of Flint’s water, we are reminding patients to use distilled water in their medical devices for humidification; i.e., oxygen, PAPs, ventilators, etc. According to the CDC, “Approximately 95% of deposited inorganic lead that is inhaled is absorbed.”http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxguides/toxguide-13.pdf

Hart Medical Equipment and The Salvation Army
As a precaution, Hart Medical Equipment and The Salvation Army have partnered to provide bottled water for patients who cannot afford to purchase distilled water for their medical devices who live within the City of Flint at 48502, 48503, 48504, 48505, 48506, 48507, or 48532. Water can be picked up from:

Hart Medical Equipment
2316 South Ballenger Hwy
Suite L
Flint, MI 48532
M-F 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
(810) 406 4444

You do not have to be a Hart Medical Equipment patient. Water is being provided by The Salvation Army, as long as supplies last. If you would like to make a financial donation, please call The Salvation Army at (810) 232 2199. Thank you.

Click below for a printable version of this flyer:
<< Distilled Water Alert – Patient Flyer >>

Lead Inhalation Alert: Community Action

Attention Healthcare Providers:

Inhaling Lead via Medical Devices

The toxic water crisis in the City of Flint affects many of our mutual patients and affects us all. We are very concerned for patients who may be using Flint tap water in their medical devices for humidification; i.e., oxygen, PAPs, ventilators, etc. According to the CDC, “Approximately 95% of deposited inorganic lead that is inhaled is absorbed.”

Hart Medical Equipment and The Salvation Army
Although Hart educates all of our patients to use distilled water in medical devices, we understand that due to economic constraints, many patients are forced to use tap water. Knowing that the City of Flint’s water contains lead, among other possible toxins, Hart Medical Equipment is teaming up with The Salvation Army to provide donated water to the City of Flint’s residents who use tap water in their medical devices.

Please Educate and Provide Flyers
Please join Hart Medical Equipment in educating patients to not use tap water in their medical devices until this crisis is over. Distilled water is the safest option. For more information regarding lead toxicity and inhalation, please visit: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxguides/toxguide-13.pdf. We are asking for your help to spread the word to all of your patients who live in the City of Flint within 48502, 48503, 48504, 48505, 48506, 48507, 48532. Please share the attached flyers inviting patients who cannot afford to buy distilled water to pick up some bottled water at Hart Medical Equipment, donated by caring people to The Salvation Army.

Water Distribution Center
Hart Medical Equipment
2316 South Ballenger Hwy
Suite L
Flint, MI 48532
M-F 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
(810) 406 4444

Donations
Hart Medical Equipment will continue to provide water for medical devices as long as the donations continue to come in.

Financial donations can be sent to:
The Salvation Army Flint Water Crisis
211 West Kearsley Street
Flint, MI 48502
(810) 232 2199

Thank you
As community partners in health, we thank you for helping educate residents of the City of Flint.

Click below for the Clinician Flyer:
<< Lead Inhalation Alert – Clinician Flyer >>

Click below for the Patient Flyer:
<< Distilled Water Alert – Patient Flyer >>

Helpful Hints for Ostomy Care

  • Change your pouching system in the bathroom where you’ll have running water, toilet paper, a wastebasket, etc…
  • Empty your pouch when it’s one third full so it’s not too heavy.
  • If the pouch fills with gas, “burp” it or empty (flatten) your pouch so it doesn’t “blow” off.
  • Do not poke holes in your pouch to let the gas out, you will no longer have an odor-proof pouch.
  • It’s not recommended to rinse your pouch out while wearing it. But, if you feel you need to do this, keep the water in the lower two thirds of your pouch when “swishing,” while holding your other hand over the upper one third of your pouch. This way, water won’t get near the stoma and break the seal of your skin barrier.
  • Change your pouching system every 3 days or as needed.
  • To prevent your peristomal skin from breaking down/becoming irritated, use a protective barrier wipe to help protect your skin.
  • If you’re using powder on broken or irritated skin, dust away the excess so your skin barrier will stick to your skin.
  • When cutting your pattern in the skin barrier, it should be 1/8” larger than your stoma. This allows the stoma to expand when passing urine or stool.
  • If you’re using paste in the tube, apply a thin, flat bead right around the pattern opening and wait about 3-4 minutes for the alcohol content in the paste to evaporate away.
  • If you have a urostomy you may want to consider connecting your pouch to a bedside drain bag at night. Then you’re connected to gravity drainage and the pouch itself isn’t filling while you sleep.
  • Pouch covers are ideal for intimate times.
  • For people who are visually-impaired or arthritic and unable to cut their own pattern, there are pre-cut and moldable skin barriers available.
  • One Inch wide ostomy belts are available for people who want to “cinch the sides” of their pouching system for added security.
  • Wide hernia belts (4”, 6”, 9”, 12”) are available for people who want to support the hernia behind their stoma.

Author: Patrice Rennick, R.N., W.O.C.N.

Are you getting enough Sleep?

Do you get enough sleep? You are not alone if your answer is no. Many people feel they are getting plenty of sleep but don’t wake up feeling refreshed. In fact, they may find themselves feeling sleepy all day. The quantity of sleep a person gets does not have much meaning if they are not receiving quality sleep.

Objectives to secure a better night’s sleep:

  • Maintain a consistent sleep schedule. Your body has an internal clock and likes consistency.
  • Keep the room dark. Light encourages the body to produce serotonin which supports wakefulness.
  • Be cautious with sleeping aids; they may help you sleep, but often times rob you of quality sleep, along with other side effects.
  • Have a comfortable surface to sleep on. You spend about 1/3 of your life in bed; you deserve to be comfortable.
  • Keep you room cool. Research has shown that people sleep better when the room temperature is cool.
  • If you snore, speak to your physician about a sleep study. There may be a correlation between your snoring, sleeplessness and not feeling refreshed.

Author: Dana Patton